10. Dialogs with Special Verbs

A) Causative Verbs

These verbs indicate that someone causes someone else to do something. When a dialog contains a causative verb, you must understand who performs the action. The verbs have, get, make, and let are the most common causative verbs. They are used in the following patterns:

Have

have someone do somethingDave had the mechanic fix his car.
have something doneDave had his car fixed.

The causative verb have indicates that one person asks or pays another to do something. The subject of this sentence, Dave, does not perform the action. In the first sentence, the mechanic does. In the second sentence, an unnamed person does.

Get

get someone do somethingJerry got his cousin to cut his hair.
get something doneJerry got his hair cut.

The causative verb get usually means to persuade someone to do something. Again note that the subject, Jerry, does not perform the action. In the first sentence, Jerry’s cousin does. In the second sentence, an unnamed person does.

Make

make someone do somethingCathy made her son do his homework.

The causative verb make means to force someone or compel someone to do something. Cathy’s son is compelled to do his homework.

Let

let someone do somethingThe boss let us go home.

The verb let means permit or allow. The boss gives permission; we go home.

Sample Items

You will hear:

M1: Did you speak to the head of the department?
F1: No, she had her assistant meet with me.
M2: What does the woman mean?

You will read:

(A) She spoke to the head of the department.
(B) The head of the department had a meeting with her assistant.
(C) She met with the assistant to the head of the department.
(D) The assistant will soon become head of the department.

The answer is (C). According to the dialog, the head of the department directed her assistant to meet with the woman.

B) Used to

The expression used to has two forms (used to and be/get used to); each with different meanings:

Used to + simple form

I used to live in New York.meansI once lived in New York (but now I don’t).

be/get + used to + gerund (-ing verb)
be/get + used to + simple form

I’m not used to driving on the left side of road.meansI’m not accustomed to driving on the left side.
I’ve finally gotten used to my new job.meansI’ve finally become accustomed to my new job.

The dialogs in Part A sometimes take advantage of these two functions of used to.

Sample Items

You will hear:

F1: What does Hank’s father do for a living?
M1: He’s a salesman now, but he used to be a truck driver.
M2: What does the man say about Hank’s father?

You will read:

(A) He once drove trucks.
(B) He sells used trucks.
(C) His truck is still useful.
(D) He’s accustomed to his job.

The answer is (A). The man says that Hank’s father used to be a truck driver. In other words, Hank’s father once drove trucks, but he no longer does so.

You will hear:

F1: Nancy is working late again today.
M1: Yeah, she must be getting used to it by now.
M2: What does the man say about Nancy?

You will read:

(A) She probably has a more difficult job now.
(B) She once worked later than she does now.
(C) She seldom comes to work late.
(D) She is becoming accustomed to late hours at work.

The answer is (D). The second speaker indicates that Nancy has probably adjusted to working late.

No votes yet.
Please wait...
error: Content is protected !!
Skip to toolbar